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Showing posts from March, 2008

Jim Mooney: THE Supergirl Artist Passes

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Back in the mid-1960s, the last week of every month (either on the last Tuesday or Thursday, I don’t remember which) I would head to the local liquor store to pick up three comic books: Detective Comics (Batman), Adventure Comics (Legion of Super-Heroes) and Action Comics (Superman and Supergirl). Action Comics would have one Superman story, usually drawn by Al Plastino and one Supergirl story, always drawn by Jim Mooney. The Supergirl story would take up about 8-10 pages, whereas the Superman story would take up about 12-15 pages. The Supergirl stories back then, usually because of the number of pages assigned to them, tended to be two-parter stories with a cliff-hanger at the end of the first part. They were well-written and well-drawn. Jim Mooney’s work complimented Supergirl very nicely. To me, Mooney was to Supergirl as Curt Swan was to Superman. Both were equally definitive to those characters. The only thing that bothered me about Mooney’s work was that he drew the oddest

G-FAN #83 Summary

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G-FAN #83 Summary The Spring 2008 issue of G-FAN (#83) is here and is loaded to the fins with plenty of goodies to keep you occupied. The issue contains: News: G-FEST IV guest information; new giant monster film; return of Guilala, G-documentary to be filmed at G-FEST and more. Interview with Biollante's Derrick Holmes by Brett Homenick. Raul Cruz takes a retrospective look at "Gammera The Invincible." "Godzilla, The Atomic Connection" by Armand Vaquer. Interviews with Gamera Gals Gloria Zoellner and Arlene Zoellner by Brett Homenick. "In Defense of GINO, Why It's Not His Fault" by Ryan Fagan defends the American Godzilla. "Cloverfield" is reviewed by Mike Bogue, J. D. Lees, Lyle Huckins, and Don Jolly. Daisuke Ishizuka reports from Japan on "Kawaii! Jenny Hits The Airways." J. D. Lees and Jeff Rebner profile more "Friends and Foes of Godzilla." Allen A. Debus takes look at "Prototypical 'Mad Scientists' o

The Mummy (1932)

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In 1932 a new horror movie was put into production to capitalize on the success of Frankenstein, and its star Boris Karloff. The initial idea was to produce a film based on the real life exploits of the French mystic Cagliostro, who claimed that he had lived for several generations. This idea was soon dropped for a screenplay that was penned by Nina Wilcox Putman that featured the resurrected corpse of an ancient Egyptian prince. One has to remember that Tutankhamen’s tomb had just recently been discovered and there was a national obsession with Egyptology. Universal felt that the combination of Karloff and this topical theme would guarantee a hit, and they were right. Despite the fact that a film featuring the popular Karloff would be shoe-in to be a success, Universal didn’t want to take any chances. Karl Freund (Frankenstein, Dracula, I Love Lucy) was hired to direct a film whose script was almost a duplicate of the script for Dracula, a film that Freund was the cinematographer for

Frankenstein (1931)

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Written By: Ken Hulsey In 1818 a young aristocrat named Mary Shelley was inspired by a summers night of ghost story readings by a group of friends, to write what may be the greatest horror story in history. Her short story, entitled “Frankenstein”, about a scientist named Victor Frankenstein and his attempts to generate new life from dead tissue has inspired novels, plays, TV series and countless movie adaptations. Her monster, however, was a far different creature than the famous interpretation by Boris Karloff in the 1931 Universal adaptation of Frankenstein that everyone is familiar with. Karloff’s monster was a slow mute who acted out violently from fear and confusion. Shelley’s monster was both intelligent and articulate. His violent behavior stemmed from the internal anguish over how it had been created. This monster was more than capable of confronting his creator intellectually with his pain and suffering. Ultimately the Karloff version was more cinematically impressive than

Interview - Fon Davis (SFX Wizard And Creator Of MORAV)

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An Interview By Ken Hulsey (Robo Japan) KH - How did the idea for MORAV first come about? FD - The idea for MORAV grew out of my interest in robotics combined with my career in motion pictures. I have always wanted to see someone do a really good live action giant robot movie or television show. First I had the idea of creating a show around 1/24th scale bipedal robots actually fighting each other in a miniature environments with a WWF over the top style. As I started writing the back story to each of the fictional pilots, I realized it would make a better science fiction story than a live show. Once I came to that conclusion, I set forth creating stories for a more gritty realistic version of MORAV. I could see the MORAV world so clearly, it practically wrote itself. That’s how I knew I had to make MORAV. KH - The effects for MORAV look top-notch. How were you able to recruit people for the project, and how have you been able to finance all this? FD - I am very fortunate to have many

Dracula (1931)

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Written By: Ken Hulsey The former Londen Lyccum Theatre manager, Bram Stoker is often credited with creating modern vampire lore through his Victorian novel Dracula, which was published on May 18, 1897. Though the inspiration for dozens of films, TV series, books and plays, Dracula was not a successful novel and is not considered an important work in Victorian literature. It is modern folklore that the inspiration for the vampire in his book was the infamous Vlad III Dracula (“Vlad the Impaler”) yet most scholars agree that is not the case. Though Stoker did discover the name “Dracul” (Dragon) while studying Romanian history and used it for the name of his vampire character, that is where the connection ends. It is a fact that the author was inspired by earlier vampire stories such as Emily Garads “Transylvania Superstitions (1885), Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (1871), John Polidori’s “The Vampyre” (1819) and Lord Byron’s “The Giaour” (1813). The main inspiration, however, would come

Star Trek (1966-1969)

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Star Trek (1966-1969) Aka: Star Trek The Original Series, Star Trek TOS Desilu/Paramount (TV) Created By: Gene Roddenberry Written By: Gene Roddenberry Cast: William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock DeForest Kelley as Lt. Cmdr. Leonard 'Bones' McCoy, M.D. James Doohan as Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery 'Scotty' Scott George Takei as Lt. Hikaru Sulu Nichelle Nichols as Lt. Nyota Uhura Walter Koenig as Ensign Pavel Chekov (1967-1969) Majel Barrett as Nurse Christine Chapel / Number One (Pilot Episode) Runtime: 79 - 60 Minute Episodes Country: USA Language: English Color: Color Sound: Mono Air Date: September 8, 1966 I, as most fans of Science Fiction, began my life-long love of the genre by watching “Star Trek”. I honestly didn’t discover the series on my own. I was “persuaded” to watch the series by my older cousin Rick, who was an avid fan. The first episode I ever saw was “Arena” which pitted Captain Kirk against the lizard-man captain of the Gor