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Showing posts from July, 2019

'Marvel Monsters' #1 smashes into your city on August 28!

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From Marvel Comics On August 28, the monsters arrive in the big, bold, beautiful celebration of all things brutish and beastly, MARVEL MONSTERS #1! Someone is doing terrible things to the Marvel Monsters, and only the wondrous wiz with the powers to draw behemouths into existence—Kid Kaiju—can stop it! But that’s not all! A murderers’ row of artists like Becky Cloonan, Gerardo Zaffino, and others are on hand to provide awesome monster splash pages, accompanied by cross sections from superstar artist Superlog! Run through the gallery below for a peek at the positively prodigious power on display in this incredible ish! Related: Monsters Unleashed #1 Cover N Midtown Exclusive Arthur Adams Variant Cover Signed By Cullen Bunn March 2017 Marvel Comics Grade NM THE EPIC BATTLE MARVEL FANS HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR, DRAWN BY TODAY'S GREATEST ARTISTS!!! It's all hands on deck with the AVENGERS, CHAMPIONS, GUARDIANS, X-MEN and the INHUMANS as they

Red Sonja & Bettie Page Celebrate Spooky Season in Specials!

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From Dynamite Entertainment Dynamite announces a fright-filled pair of Halloween themed special one-shots starring Red Sonja and Bettie Page! In Savage Tales: A Red Sonja Halloween Special, writer Mark Russell brings in artist Jacob Edgar (James Bond: Moneypenny) to tell an extra-length spooky story. Dearbhla Kelly and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou also jump over from the regular series for this essential tale for fans of the She-Devil with a Sword. All underneath a striking cover from Erica D'Urso (Xena, Captain Marvel), drawing inspiration from the original Savage Tales #1. This one-shot perfectly complements issue 9 of the ongoing series, out the same month. While that issue has Sonja returning to the Sorcerers of Wigur-Nomadene, Savage Tales flashes back to their first encounter. At this point, Sonja is not yet a legend, but a brute full of anger and ambition. Savage. Everyone's favorite fiery heroine tries to convince the sorcerers to bring her family and friends back to l

Flashback Friday 'To Smash A Spider'

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From Atomic Robot Comics It looks like your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man is in trouble again. After the accidental death of Gwen Stacy's father (Police Captain George Stacy) a smear campaign against the web-slinger turns everyone in Peter Parker's life against him. Amazing Spider-Man #91 (1963 1st Series) December 1970 Marvel Comics Cover art by John Romita, script by Stan Lee, pencils by Gil Kane, inks by John Romita It is the funeral of George Stacy and everyone close to the late police captain is in attendance. Peter Parker is there to support Gwen during this time, however, he begins to consider what would happen if Gwen, who blames Spider-Man for her father's death, ever found out that Peter is Spider-Man. Also in attendance is Sam Bullit, a man who was competing with George for the job of district attorney. When Gwen later asks to aid on Bullit's campaign, it's another advantage to Bullit. Bullit then seeks the support of the Daily Bugle in excha

James Bond 'Live and Let Die' Adaptation Coming in September from Dynamite!

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From Dynamite Entertainment Ian Fleming's second James Bond novel is being adapted to the graphic novel format this fall. Live and Let Die follows the successful Casino Royale release and agent 007 as he traces stolen pirate treasure from the smoky jazz clubs of Harlem all the way to the formidable shores of Jamaica. Writer Van Jensen (Flash, Green Lantern Corps) returns for this entry following his critically acclaimed Casino Royale graphic novel with Dennis Calero. This time, Kewber Baal (Army of Darkness, Jennifer Blood) has been enlisted to provide art. Complimented by his steadfast partner Schimerys Baal's (KISS) coloring. Fay Dalton (Vampirella) returns to bestow Bond fans with another sleek noir-inspired cover. This top tier creative team is primed to tackle one of the most unique Bond adventures. In Live and Let Die, Bond is at first sent across the Atlantic to The City That Never Sleeps to investigate Mr. Big, an agent of the Secret Service-opposed SMERSH. Fan-

As a new era dawns for the mutants, revisit the '80s classic 'X-Factor' #1!

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From Marvel Comics X-Factor #1 February 1986 Marvel Comics Grade NM - $14.99 - Shop Now Story by Bob Layton. Art by Jackson Guice, Bob Layton, and Joe Rubinstein. Cover by Walt Simonson. Return of Jean Grey: Part 3 of 3 - "Third Genesis!": Mr. Fantastic cameo. Avengers flashback cameo. Anchorage, Alaska, Scott Summers is outside chopping wood with his optic blasts when he's asked to come inside by his wife Madeyline Pryor so that he can watch their son Nathan while she runs some errands. However, upon entering their family home, Scott is distracted by a television report about the possible Mutant Menace and the government considering the idea of making all mutants register. When Maddie notices this she becomes angry and berates her husband for worrying over mutants and reminds him that he is no longer an X-Man and that he should be focusing more on his family than on the fates of mutant kind. That night when she notices Scott standing outside on the balcony br

A Look Back At The First Issue Of The Walking Dead

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From Image Comics When was the last time you read The Walking Dead #1? I originally read it back in 2003 shortly before it went to press, and while I remember liking it, I don’t think it occurred to me then just how good it was. When we received copies at the Image offices, I recall admiring how well the greytones printed and thinking that it was a sharp looking book, but at the time it was just one of several series we were debuting that October as a part of a new horror line. I was Image’s Director of Sales & Marketing at the time, and my primary concern at that point was making sure people knew it existed. Reading it now, though, nearly 16 years later, it’s pretty much a perfect first issue. Even if you haven’t read The Walking Dead, you probably know that it’s a series about mankind’s struggle for survival in a world overrun by the living dead—or as Robert Kirkman once put it, a “zombie movie that never ends.” What makes it different from zombie movies, though—and fr

DC Comics Secretly Cancels MAD Magazine

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From Vulture Venerable joke rag MAD Magazine will be ceasing publication of original content. Blogger Jedidiah Leland reported that a longtime editor broke the news in a private Facebook group, and MAD writer David DeGrand confirmed the story on his personal Twitter. Rather than create new comedy, MAD will recycle old content until their subscription obligation is fulfilled, then potentially shut down altogether. An email from DC Comics sent to freelancers and obtained by Vulture says that Issue 10 will be the last of MAD with original content. While not stating whether the publication would cease entirely, the email confirms that MAD will no longer commission new content for either the print or online versions of MAD, for however long they continue to exist. In the wake of the news, many contributors have been posting farewell tweets to the mag. So far, DC Comics has made no official statement, but there have been signs of trouble for the eagle-eyed. Editor Allie Goertz was lai

Discover how the Stars and Stripes came into existence

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The simple fact that many Americans now view our nation's original flag as a symbol of racism on par with the Nazi party's swastika shows just how much our educational system has failed. In an attempt to stem the tide of ignorance I think it's time to set the record straight with a good old fashioned history lesson. From History When the American Revolution broke out in 1775, the colonists didn’t yet unite under a single flag. Instead, they fought mainly under unit or regimental flags, according to Marc Leepson, author of the book “Flag: An American Biography.” One flag of the time featured a picture of a coiled rattlesnake with the slogan “Don’t Tread on Me,” while another showed a pine tree with the words “An Appeal to Heaven.” “There really wasn’t anything that was stars and stripes, red, white and blue,” said Mike Buss, a flag expert with the American Legion veterans’ organization. In June 1775, the Second Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, created