The Monstrous Movie Clip Of The Day: 2001: A Space Odyssey [HD] Docking Sequence



Source: Youtube

Without a doubt one of the most spectacular scenes from any science fiction film! In this sequence from "2001: A Space Odyssey" Film maker Stanley Kubrick combines the elegance of The Blue Danube waltz by Johann Strauss II with the work of an amazing special effects team that comprised NASA, science advisor Fred Ordway, production designer Harry Lange, and model maker Anthony Masters under the direction of Douglas Trumbull.

- Ken Hulsey

Quickly:

2001: A Space Odyssey is a 1968 epic science fiction film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick, and co-written by Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke, partially inspired by Clarke's short story The Sentinel. The story deals with a series of encounters between humans and mysterious black monoliths that are apparently affecting human destiny, and a space voyage to Jupiter tracing a signal emitted by one such monolith found on the moon. Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood star as the two astronauts on this voyage, with Douglas Rain as the voice of the sentient computer HAL who "seems human" and has full control over their spaceship.

The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for On the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866. Originally performed 13 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success however and Strauss is reputed to have said "The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda—I wish that had been a success!"

Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an American film director, writer, producer, and photographer, who lived in England during most of the last four decades of his career. Kubrick was noted for the scrupulous care with which he chose his subjects, a slow method of working, the variety of genres he worked in, technical perfectionism, reluctance to talk about his films, and reclusiveness. He maintained almost complete artistic control, but with the rare advantage of big-studio financial support for all his endeavors.

- Wikipedia

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